Central Navajo Fair Schedule

 Central Agency Navajo Fair and Rodeo

Chinle, Arizona

“HONORING OUR LAW ENFORCEMENT – TO PROTECT AND SERVE”?

Navajo Rodeo-03

Events include the parade, carnival, pageants, pow wow, song & dance, baby contest, vendor village, charity run, horse race, hip hop/country dances, metal show, rave & rodeo.

FAIR SCHEDULE

Fair Grounds Admission:
$7 Adults
$5 Kids and Elders
5 and under free
Admission starts Friday and it gives you access to the Rodeo, PowWow, Song and Dance and the Carnival.

Monday, August 21, 2017
4:00 p.m. 2017 Baby Contest, Apache County

Tuesday, August 22, 2017
5:00 p.m. Lil Miss Central & Brave Pageant, Apache County

Wednesday, August 23, 2017
6.00 p.m. Miss Central Pre-Teen Pageant, Chinle Elementary School

Thursday, August 24, 2017
8:00 a.m. 2017 Central Agency Fair Youth Day, C.C.C.
1:00 p.m. Miss Central Teen Pageant, Apache County
6:00 p.m. Frazier Carnival Opens, Gorman’s Fairgrounds

Friday, August 25, 2017
9:00 a.m. Elder Fest, C.C.C.
11:00 a.m. Vendor Village, Gorman’s Fairgrounds
4:00 p.m. Miss Central Navajo Pageant, Mesa Elem. School
5:00 p.m. Opening Prayer/Gourd Dancing, Gorman’s Fairgrounds
6:00 p.m. Frazier Carnival, Gorman’s Fairgrounds
6:00 p.m. Song & Dance, Gorman’s Fairgrounds
6:00 p.m. All Women’s Rodeo, Gorman’s Fairgrounds
7:00 p.m. Pow-Wow Grand Entry, Gorman’s Fairgrounds

Saturday, August 26, 2017
6:00 a.m. Parade Line-up, Chinle Flea Market
9:00 a.m. Parade Begins, Hwy 191 North-South
8:00 a.m. Open Junior Rodeo, Gorman’s Fairgrounds
10:00 a.m. Vendor Village, Gorman’s Fairgrounds
10:00 AM Registration for Song & Dance,
CAF/Gorman’s Rodeo Grounds
3:00 PM Frazier Carnival opens
3:00 PM 2017-2018 Miss Central Navajo Coronation (Rodeo Arena)
CAF/Gorman’s Rodeo Grounds
5:00 PM Gourd Dancing – Pow Wow Arena
CAF/Gorman’s Rodeo Grounds
7:00 PM Open Show Rodeo 1st Performance
7:00 PM Pow-Wow Final Grand Entry
CAF/Gorman’s Rodeo Grounds

Sunday, August 27, 2017
8:00 a.m. Morning Slack – Rodeo (If necessary) Gorman’s Rodeo Grounds
10:00 a.m.Vendor Village Open, Gorman’s Rodeo Grounds
10:00 a.m. Song & Dance Grand Entry, Gorman’s Rodeo Grounds
2:00 p.m. Open Show Rodeo 2nd Performance, Gorman’s Rodeo Grounds
3:00 p.m. Frazier Carnival Opens, Gorman’s Rodeo Grounds

 Map to Location:

 

Mini Miss Western Navajo Pageant

mini-miss-western-pageant-oct-10

October, 10 2016
6:00 PM DST

Greyhills Academy High School Auditorium
Tuba City, Arizona
Ages 6 to 9

  1. Eligibility Requirements
  2. Enrolled member of Navajo Nation with CBI
  3. Contestants must be between 6 and 9 to qualify for Mini Miss Western Navajo.
  4. Contestants must have a knowledge of Navajo culture and Tradition.
  5. Contestants must be enrolled or attending school within the Western Navajo Agency.
  6. Contestants can’t have held the title of Mini Miss Western Navajo or lil Miss Western Navajo

Applications available at Dine Y.O.U.T.H.
210 South Main Street Tuba City, Arizona
Phone: 928-283-3022
West of old community center

More Western Navajo Fair Information

 

Lil Miss Western Navajo Pageant

Western Navajo Fair – Tuba City, AZ

Tuesday, October 13, 2015 – 6 PM DST

Mini Miss Western Navajo Pageant

Lil Miss Western Navajo Pageant Location

Greyhills Academy High School Auditorium

Tuba City, Arizona

Ages 10 to 12

Application Deadline: October, 11, 2015

 

Eligibility Requirements

  1. Enrolled member of Navajo Nation with CBI
  2. Contestants must be between 10 and 12 to qualify for Lil Miss Western Navajo.
  3. Contestants must have a knowledge of Navajo culture and Tradition.
  4. Contestants must be enrolled or attending school within the Western Navajo Agency.
  5. Contestants can’t have held the title of Mini Miss Western Navajo or lil Miss Western Navajo

 

Applications available at Dine Y.O.U.T.H.

210 South Main Street Tuba City, Arizona

Phone: (928) 283-3022

West of old community center

More Western Navajo Fair Information

Western Navajo Fair

Miss Western Navajo Teen Pageant

Miss Western Navajo Teen PageantWednesday, October 14, 2015 – 6 PM DST
Tuba City, Arizona
Greyhills Academy High School Auditorium

Western Navajo Diné
Youth Eligibility Requirements:
-Candidate must be enrolled member of the Navajo Nation w/CIB.
-Candidate must be between the ages of 13 and 17.
-Candidate must be single. Never married and with no children.
-Candidate must be knowledgeable in Navajo Heritage, Culture, Tradition, and Values.
-Must have never held the title of Miss Western Navajo Teen.

Applications available at Office of Dine’ YOUTH, across from Tuba City Community Center.
Contact us at (928)283-3021.
More Information at:
facebook.com/wnaody

Western Navajo Fair 2015 Schedule of Events

Kid’s Day Western Navajo Fair

Western Dinè Youth Presents “Kids Day” at the Western Navajo Fair in Tuba City, Arizona.

Kid's Day  Western Navajo FairThursday, October 16th, 2014

 

Events include:

Games, Fun, Entertainment, door prizes, carnival, Info booths, and Outdoor Activities.

For more information, contact Dine’ Youth at (928) 283-3021.

Download Booth Registration Form here:

http://westernnavajofair.com/Applications/KidsDayBoothRegistration.pdf

More Western Navajo Fair Information

 Western Navajo Fair

 Western Navajo Fairgrounds Tuba City, Arizona.

Official Poster for the Northern Navajo Nation Fair

Created by Mr. David K. John from Kayenta, Arizona

Poster Northern Navajo Nation Fair

Copyright 2014 Northern Navajo Nation Fair

“This year’s poster of the Northern Navajo Nation Fair was created and painted by Mr. David K. John from Kayenta, Arizona. His image reflects the cultural event that many spectators from across the Navajo Reservation observe through the fair activities. This year’s fair theme, “Beginning our journey with the communities to enrich ideas and opportunities,” demonstrates our enrichment through tradition, culture and harvest. As we are blessed with our cultural teachings to observe our mother earth and the many blessings we as Dine follow the blessing way of life through our beliefs, teachings, sacred knowledge and our families.” -Robert Felson, Fair Director

Artist David K. John Website

For more information in the 2014 Northern Navajo Nation Fair In Shiprock, AZ

 

 

Della Toadlena Author, Professor, a Living History

Della Toadlena Living History Video

 

This documentary film was researched, photographed, edited and produced by students of Winona State University (Winona, Minnesota) and Diné College (Tsaile, Arizona, Navajo Nation) during summer 2013.

It contains stories Della Toadlena of Chinle, Arizona, told to the students during several hours of interviews about his life.

This documentary film is archived at the Navajo Nation Museum, Navajo Nation Library, Winona State University Library, and Diné College Library, and will be archived at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian.

The film is part of the Navajo Oral History project, a multi-year collaboration between the Winona State University Mass Communication Department and Diné College – The official Tribal College of the Navajo Nation


Della Toadlena was born in Canyon Del Muerto and grew up around the Black Rock area in northeastern Arizona.

Della began school at age five, going on six, at a Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school. When she arrived at the dormitory, her parents learned their daughter had not been previously registered, and there was no more room, so she could not be admitted.

Della Toadlena Portrait

Besides, the school personnel said, She’s just five and won’t be six until October. We can’t take her; she’s underage. However, at the end of the day, another little girl who had been registered did not show up, and the school had to fill its quota, so it allowed the author to stay and go to school.

She went on to earn an AA and a BA in Elementary Education and an MA in English. Then the author joined the Humanities Division faculty at Dine College and taught English and Introduction to Native American Literature until she retired in May 2007.

Della Toadlena

Navajo Della Toadlena felt that her children didn’t know the history and origin of her
Navajo clan. It was this reason she decided towrite a book, “Our Story: Nihahane’”

The book begins with the history of Toadlena’s people and ends with her present-day life as a grandmother and retired college professor.
She wrote the book as a way of documenting her family’s history for her grandchildren and future generations.

Della Toadlena-Front Porch

In “Our Story,” Toadlena describes where and how her traditional clan came about, and then shares her childhood growing up on the Navajo Reservation along with her educational experiences at the Bureau of Indian Affairs Mission Schools.

An excerpt from Della Toadlena book “Our Story”:
As a child I remember sitting up late at night with my sisters helping Grandma, Asdzaan Altsisi and our mother preparing food for the next day. Often it was roasting and grinding corn into meal for cornbread, pudding, dumpling or mush. Asdzaan Altsisi was our mother’s paternal grandmother. My mother was just three when her mother died, and this old lady took her under her wings and raised her. She was already a very old woman with white hair when we lived with her. Another time when there had been the butchering of a sheep, it was peeling the inside lining of the skin and running skewers of fat through it.
“I believe my book will appeal to young Native Americans who are constantly looking for people that will provide positive role models and help them see that they can become and accomplish whatever they set their minds to,” explains Toadlena.

Source: Amazon books Bio and Google books

Western Navajo Nation Fair Parade

Western Navajo Parade Saturday, October 19th, 2013

Navajo Nation Band

Navajo Nation Band

The line-up will be at 4:00 am and the parade will begin at 9:00 am. The line-up will be at the Tuba City High School Parking Lot & Warrior Drive. (If you are requesting to be in the first thirty floats, please email the Parade Coordinator as soon as possible or you will be placed in the order floats arrive to the parade line-up. NO ACCEPTIONS!

Friday, October 18, 2013

3:00 PM Parade Orientation Check-In

3:30 PM Parade Orientation Begins

5:00 PM Dinner Served to Checked-In Attendees

Saturday, October 19th, 2013

4:00 AM Parade Line-Up Begins

9:00 AM Parade Begins

Tuba City, Arizona

If you are interested in applying for the 45th Western Navajo Nation Fair Parade, enclosed is an application that needs to be completely filled out with the correct information and return by the deadlines listed below.

Application deadlines are as follows: Deadline – Friday, October 4th, 2013 @ 5:00 PM

Deadline for Late Application – Tuesday, October 15th, 2013 @ 5:00 PM

**Late Fees of $25.00 Apply**

Parade Application Link

Upon receiving your application, it will be reviewed. You will be notified of your acceptance or non-acceptance after the review. You will not be guaranteed a spot in the parade until application and payment have been received.

 

Please feel free to contact me at (928) 640-6244 or email at aebenally@dinecollege.edu if you have any questions.

The Parade Committee looks forward to your returned application. Don’t forget to check out any of the other events the Fair Committee has set up for your enjoyment at the 45th Western Navajo Nation Fair.

Sincerely, Aaron Benally Aaron Benally

Parade Coordinator

 

Standing Rock Native Returns as Navajo Nation Fair Manager

 Navajo Nation Fair ManagerBy Roberta John
WINDOW ROCK, AZ. – It’s never too late.
That is, it’s never too late to become a world champion.
Words that fit Geneva Tsouhlarkis who is also the new Navajo Nation Fair Manager.
She exemplifies what it takes to become a world champion – prayer, hard work and steadfast dedication.
Most people may think of hanging up their spurs or think of retiring at age 50, but not the Standing Rock, New Mexico native.
In fact, Tsouhlarkis gives new meaning to life….that it’s never too late to make changes in your life and even become a winner.
It’s one thing to become a world champion when you are in your teens and physically fit, but when you’re past 50 years old…now that’s what you call setting a real world record.
She first became a National Indian World Barrel Racing Champion at age 33 during the Indian National Finals Rodeo in Albuquerque in 1988.
Then 18 years later…that’s right, 18 years later….Tsouhlarkis rocked the rodeo arena and stunned everyone by clinching the National Indian World Barrel Racing Champion title at age 51 during the Indian National Finals Rodeo in San Carlos, Arizona in 2006.
Yes there are faster horses and younger women constantly entering the rodeo circuit, but with a renewed determination and a new quarter horse name Tip, Tsouhlarkis showed everyone in the house that she was still a force to be reckoned with.
Today, Tsoularakis maintains a busy life of multi-tasking her role as a wife, mother, her career and her lifestyle as a rancher and is still a competitive rodeo athlete.
Speaking of making a comeback, no she didn’t say “I’ll be back” or thought that she would return as the Navajo Nation Fair Manager, but she believes it was meant to be.
She was the Navajo Nation Fair Manager from 1989 to 1991. She wanted to serve longer, but her priority and still her driving force in life is her family.
She hung up her Navajo Nation Fair title and began working in Crownpoint, New Mexico as a Senior Planner where she worked there for 13 years assisting nine different chapters in Eastern Agency with strategic planning and various other local government projects and issues.
Tsouhlarkis said she really enjoyed being a Navajo Nation Fair Manager several years ago, but she wanted and needed to spend more time with her family. Her children are now grown so she is able to adjust her career.
Ever since she can remember, Tsouhlarkis has always been around animals, which include her sheep, cattle and horses.
She is accustomed to waking up during the early morning dawn and tend to her animals. Most people might see it as hard work, but she loves it with a passion and wouldn’t live any other way.
“Even if I get home late, I always spend time with my animals,”she said. “I have to spend time with my animals because they are a part of me.”
That connection couldn’t be more evident in the world of rodeo. She is well-known throughout Indian country and even in the professional rodeo circuit as a highly-skilled rodeo competitor.
In 1977, she graduated from the University of Albuquerque with a degree in business administration and a minor in accounting. She also attended Haskell Indian Junior College and obtained a AA degree in secretarial education and liberal arts.
She looks forward to continuing her role as the Navajo Nation Fair Manager, noting, “It’s like I never left. I want to make the Navajo Nation Fair the place to be. Although we call it the Navajo Nation Fair, I want other tribes to enter our rodeo, pow wows, night performances, and parade. I also want to invite visitors who travel from throughout the world to come and experience our colorful and beautiful Navajo culture. See, hear, taste and experience the lively spirit of the Navajo culture here in Window Rock, Arizona.”
Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation Department Manager Martin L. Begaye, said, “We are very pleased and honored to have Geneva Tsouhlarkis return as the Navajo Nation Fair Manager. She exemplifies the characteristics of a true champion and what it takes to be a leader. Being a manager for the Largest American Indian Fair in North America – the Navajo Nation Fair – takes a lot of time and requires a unique set of leadership skills to communicate and manage many different people.”

 

Samuel Tom Holiday – Navajo Code Talker

Living History Samuel Tom Holiday Navajo Code Talker

Samuel Tso Holiday-Silver Medallion

Photo by Tom Grier/Navajo Oral History Project.

Despite being forbidden to speak the Navajo language at boarding schools, Samuel Holiday recognized the importance of his language and culture.

He shares stories of his service in the U.S. Marines during World War II as a testament to this power. As a Navajo Code Talker, he served in the South Pacific, transmitting and receiving messages that were never deciphered by the Japanese.

Samuel Tom Holiday Navajo Code Talker

Photo by Tom Grier/Navajo Oral History Project.

Samuel´s legacy goes beyond his military duty. He is a role model and source of inspiration for Navajo youth.

This documentary film was researched, photographed, edited and produced by students of Winona State University (Winona, Minnesota) and Diné College (Tsaile, Arizona, Navajo Nation) during summer 2012.

It contains stories Samuel Tom Holiday of Kayenta, Arizona, told the students during several hours of interviews about his life.
Samuel Tom Holiday Winona

Project completed by:
Kelsey Curtis – DC
Liam Krause – WSU
Rachel Rivers – WSU
Christine Willie – DC

This documentary film is archived at the Navajo Nation MuseumNavajo Nation LibraryWinona State University Library, and Diné College Library, and will be archived at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian.

The film is part of the Navajo Oral History project, a multi-year collaboration between the Winona State UniversityMass Communication Department and Diné College– The official Tribal College of the Navajo Nation