Louva Dahozy – Navajo Broadcaster

Navajo Oral History

This documentary film was researched, photographed, edited and produced by students of Winona State University (Winona, Minnesota) and Diné College (Tsaile, Arizona, Navajo Nation) during summer 2015. It contains stories Louva Dahozy of Fort Defiance, Arizona, told the students during several hours of interviews about her life.

Louva conducted most of her interview in the Navajo language, English subtitles are provided.

This documentary film is archived at the Navajo Nation Museum, Navajo Nation Library, Winona State University Library, and Diné College Library, and will be archived at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian.

The film is part of the Navajo Oral History project, a multi-year collaboration between the Winona State University Mass Communication Department and Diné College – The official Tribal College of the Navajo Nation

Louva Dahozy - Navajo Broadcaster

Photos by Tom Grier,  Winona State University

In 1994, the  University of Arizona College of Agriculture awarded Louva McCabe Dahozy its Lifetime Award.

Louva McCabe Dahozy has blended her interest in helping others with her Navajo religious and cultural values. She was born of the Haskaahaszoi clan and for the Kinyaanii clan. In 1994, the College of Agriculture awarded her its Lifetime Award.

While living in Parker, she worked with Cooperative Extension, assisting local communities in home economics.

When Louva returned to the Navajo reservation, she organized 4-H clubs, teaching hundreds about livestock, home economics, and cultural awareness. She established the first Navajo Homemakers radio program, which was broadcast in the Navajo language on eight stations for ten years.

Louva, with help from Cooperative Extension, helped begin the North America Indian Women’s Association; she was elected first national chairwoman. This group directly sought funding from Congress to help solve local problems.

In addition, Louva was a founder of the National Indian Council on Aging and helped organize Navajo Nation Council on Aging. She developed the first Navajo Illustrated Cookbook, using commodity and native foods. She was the motivating force behind a native foods analysis that proved they had a high nutritional value.

Asked about her lifelong work, Louva says, “I wanted to provide education for Navajo people, education that includes traditional and modern ways so that people might have better home

Source: University of Arizona College of Agriculture

Louva Dahozy in Kitchen

First Navajo Clans Lesson

Navajo Language Lesson and  Video

Video for Language Lesson 10 Clans
Presenter Clayton Long

Navajo Language Lesson links

Clayton Long – Instructor
Clayton Long YouTube Channel
Navajo Language Lessons Page
Navajo Language Lessons YouTube Channel
Navajo People Language Page
Heritage Language Resource Center
Harold Carey Jr – Computer Teacher

The Navajo Clan Wheel can be used with the Navajo Clan Legends Poster and the Clan Legends book.

clan book thumbClan poster thumb

Navajo Clan Legends Poster

Display the traditional Narrative depicting the way in which Changing Woman created the Four Original Clans. Mountains, plants, Clan Journey Stories, and Protection Animals associated with the Clans.

This beautiful poster was created from illustrations by Theresa Breznau. Changing Woman is at the center, encircled by a rainbow yei and framed by the four sacred mountains. The four original clans, Bitterwater, Mud people, Towering House, and One Walks Around You, their associations and descriptions, surround the rainbow. The posters are in full-color and laminated.

This poster can be used with the Navajo Clan Wheel and the Clan Legends book.

Laminated on heavy cardstock.

This poster can be purchased in two sizes:

11? x 17? – $2.00
18? x 22? – $6.00

Ordering Information

San Juan School District
Heritage Language Resource Center
28 West 200 North
Phone: 435-678-1230
FAX: 435-678-1283
Store Hours: 9:00 – 4:30
Monday through Thursday
Email: rstoneman@sjsd.org

Dinè Bingo History and Tradition

Dinè Bingo is an excellent way to have fun while building Navajo Language vocabulary and expanding cultural knowledge.

Dine Bingo History Card

Dine Bingo History Card

Each game set includes 15, 8.5″ x 11″ playing cards, enough for 15 students to play at one time. Printed on heavy cardstock and laminated.

Each game introduces 50 vocabulary words. Also included are sturdy hardboard tokens, master word chart, tray, and instructions, all stored in a durable box.

Dine Bingo History Vocabulary list

Dine Bingo History Vocabulary list

Dinè Bingo History and Tradition includes the following Navajo vocabulary words: abalone, bear, “Bitter Water” Clan, black, black ant, blue, Changing Woman, cornpollen, coyote, eagle feather, east, First Man, First Woman, First World, First World insects, Fourth World, “He Walks Around You” Clan, hogan, jet, lizard, locust, medicine bundle, mountain lion, “Mud People” Clan, Navajo Twins (names), north, porcupine, puberty ceremony, rabbit, red ant, rug, sand painting, sash belt, Second World, Second World birds, shoe game, skunk, south, stars, sweathouse, Third World, “Towering House” Clan, turkey, turquoise, wedding basket, west, white, white shell, yellow, yellow ant.

Bingo Place Card

Bingo Place Card

Ordering Information

Price $12.00 USD

San Juan School District
Heritage Language Resource Center
28 West 200 North
Phone: 435-678-1230
FAX: 435-678-1283
Store Hours: 9:00 – 4:30
Monday through Thursday
Email: rstoneman@sjsd.org

Online order at this Website: media.sjsd.org

We accept purchase orders, credit cards, and checks.
We bill only for items shipped and actual cost of shipping.
Personal orders ship after payment is received.
Please estimate 10% of purchase total for shipping cost.

The Eagle Can Fly – Atsa Dahdiit’a’

The Eagle Can Fly - Atsa Dahdiit'a' Book Cover

The Eagle Can Fly – Atsa Dahdiit’a’ Book Cover

Written by Lucille Mescale Hunt and Illustrated by Charles Yanito

This book presents the charming story of a young eagle and how he learns to use his wings to become self-reliant and successful in the world. The text is in both Navajo language and English. The book is colorfully illustrated with delightful paintings that children will love.

The Eagle Can Fly

60 pages (includes both Navajo and English languages)
This book is appropriate for 3rd -5th grade English and 3rd grade and above for Navajo language readers.
Paperback with full-color illustrations

Ordering Information

$10.00 USD

San Juan School District
Heritage Language Resource Center
28 West 200 North
Phone: 435-678-1230
FAX: 435-678-1283
Store Hours: 9:00 – 4:30
Monday through Thursday
Email: rstoneman@sjsd.org

Online order at this Website: media.sjsd.org

We accept purchase orders, credit cards, and checks.
We bill only for items shipped and actual cost of shipping.
Personal orders ship after payment is received.
Please estimate 10% of purchase total for shipping cost.

 

My Mother – Navajo Language Lesson

My Mother - Navajo Language Lesson

My Mother – Navajo Language Lesson

MY MOTHER
My mother is sun-browned color. Her eyes are dark. Her hair shines black.
My mother is good to look at, but I like her hands the best.

They are beautiful.
They are strong and quick at working, but when they touch my hands they are slow moving and gentle.

SHIMÁ
Shimá t’óó dinlzhííni yee’.
Banázhiin dilhil.
Bitsii dilhilgo dik’inizdidlaad.

Shimá níliigo nizhóni, ndi bíla ‘íghisíí shil yá’át’ééh.
Bíla’ nizhóni.
Bíla’ bitse’ dóó doondilna’da naalnishgo, ndi shíla’ yiyiltso’go hazhóó’ógo naha’náá dóó shaayisti’.

From:
Little Herder In Autumn
by Ann Clark
United States Department Of The Interior
Illustrated By Hoke Denetsosie

Little Herder – Navajo Language Lessons

Story Telling – Navajo Language Lesson
Build a Fire – Navajo Language Lesson
Little Lambs – Navajo Language Lesson
Field – Navajo Language Lesson
The Waterhole – Navajo Language Lesson
The Puppy – Navajo Language Lesson
Sheep Corral – Navajo Language Lesson
Possessions – Navajo Language Lesson
Breakfast – Little Herder Story
The Sing – Navajo Language Lesson
Going To The Sing – Navajo Language Lesson
Sleep – Navajo Language Lesson
Supper – Navajo Language Lesson
Father Comes Back – Navajo Language Lesson
Shoveling Snow – Navajo Language Lesson
The Dogs are Hungry – Navajo Language Lesson
There Is No Food – Navajo Story

More Navajo language links:

The Moccasin Game – A Navajo Legend

The Shoe or Moccasin gameThe Moccasin Game Book and CD

October (Ghaaji) marks the time for shoe games.

The Shoe or Moccasin game is part of Navajo curing ceremonies.
The games are used to teach the young people endurance and self respect.
All Navajo games have a special meaning that is told in a story.

“In the beginning, the Earth was not divided into day and night as it is today. The Daytime Animals and the Nighttime Animals could not agree about how the Earth would be organized. Of course, the Daytime Animals wanted to have daylight all the time, but the Nighttime Animals wanted the world to remain dark. The Giant taught the animals to play the Moccasin Game, and he used the game to decide how days and nights would be organized.”

The Shoe or Moccasin game

Read the book in both English and Navajo to learn the rest of the story!

This hard-cover, perfect-bound book is based upon a traditional story, as told by Done Mose, Jr. This bilingual book is elegantly illustrated by renowned Navajo artist, Baje Whitethorne and edited by Katherine Hurst. The book also includes a CD with the Moccasin Game songs sung by Jim Dandy, Sr. and Monument Valley High School students.

Cultural Awareness: this book and the Moccasin Game songs can be read, sung and enjoyed during the winter months, October through February. Please be respectful and let the story “rest” during the remainder of the seasonal cycle. Thank you!

Comes with a CD with 9 songs sung in The Navajo language.
Nahashch idi (Badger)
Jadi (Antelope)
Galbahi (Cottontail Rabbit)
Ashiike (Young Boys)
Ch indeelidii (Crow)
Nashdoi (Lion)
Ne ashjaa (Owl)
Tazhii (Turkey)
Hayiilka (Daybreak)

 

Ordering Information

$20.00 USD With Audio CD

San Juan School District
Heritage Language Resource Center
28 West 200 North
Phone: 435-678-1230
FAX: 435-678-1283
Store Hours: 9:00 – 4:30
Monday through Thursday
Email: rstoneman@sjsd.org

Online order at this Website: media.sjsd.org

We accept purchase orders, credit cards, and checks.
We bill only for items shipped and actual cost of shipping.
Personal orders ship after payment is received.
Please estimate 10% of purchase total for shipping cost.

The Cornfield – Navajo Language Lesson

Lesson in English and Diné Bizaad:

THE CORNFIELD

The cornfield is fenced with poles. My mother works in the cornfield. My father works in the cornfield. While they are working I walk among the corn plants.
I sing to the tall tasseled corn.
In the middle of all these known things stands my mother’s hogan with its open door.

NAADAA BADAAK’EH

Naaadaa bá dá’ak’eh tsin bee biná ázt’i’.
Shimá dá’ák’ehgi naalnish.
Ndaalnishgo naadaa’ bitaasháa leh.
Díí t’áá ‘alníigi shimá bighan t’áá ch’íjool’áajgo si’a´

The Cornfield - Navajo Language Lesson

From:
Little Herder In Autumn
by Ann Clark
United States Department Of The Interior
Illustrated By Hoke Denetsosie

Little Herder – Navajo Language Lessons

Story Telling – Navajo Language Lesson
Build a Fire – Navajo Language Lesson
Little Lambs – Navajo Language Lesson
Field – Navajo Language Lesson
The Waterhole – Navajo Language Lesson
The Puppy – Navajo Language Lesson
Sheep Corral – Navajo Language Lesson
Possessions – Navajo Language Lesson
Breakfast – Little Herder Story
The Sing – Navajo Language Lesson
Going To The Sing – Navajo Language Lesson
Sleep – Navajo Language Lesson
Supper – Navajo Language Lesson
Father Comes Back – Navajo Language Lesson
Shoveling Snow – Navajo Language Lesson
The Dogs are Hungry – Navajo Language Lesson
There Is No Food – Navajo Story

More Navajo language links:

Chxóshii and Her Horse, Bucky

New Navajo Language Story Book

By Leatrice Klah

Chxóshii and Her Horse, Bucky

Illustrations by Molly Trainor.

We are so excited to introduce a new bilingual storybook for intermediate (grades 3-6) Navajo Language learners.

This 32-page book is written by SJSD Bluff Elementary language teacher, Leatrice Klah. Her first book
relates one of her childhood memories. Delightful illustrations by Molly Trainor.

Leatrice Klah

 

My name is Leatrice Klah. I am originally from a place called Antelope Lookout Point, Rock Point, Arizona. I am a single parent of two beautiful girls, Sheridan and Laci Attakai. I am a strong believer of revitalizing and keeping our Dinè language and culture. It is who we are as Dinè people.

Ordering Information

Soft cover – $10.00

San Juan School District
Heritage Language Resource Center
28 West 200 North
Phone: 435-678-1230
FAX: 435-678-1283
Store Hours: 9:00 – 4:30
Monday through Thursday
Email: rstoneman@sjsd.org

Online order at this Website: media.sjsd.org

Click here for New Spring 2014  Catalog

We accept purchase orders, credit cards, and checks.
We bill only for items shipped and actual cost of shipping.
Personal orders ship after payment is received.
Please estimate 10% of purchase total for shipping cost.

Navajo Language Alphabet Cards

Learn Diné Bizaad

This set contains 36 colorful, visually large cards, each measuring 5.5″ x 8.5″.

Navajo Alphabet Cards

Printed on heavy cardstock with illustrations by Theresa Breznau. Consonants are highlighted in black, vowels in red, blends and diacritical marks are in green.
Cards are also available as a laminated set. Please use drop-down menu to select your choice.

Set of 36 cards
$15.00 on heavy cardstock
$30.00 Laminated

Ordering Information

San Juan School District
Heritage Language Resource Center
28 West 200 North
Phone: 435-678-1230
FAX: 435-678-1283
Store Hours: 9:00 – 4:30
Monday through Thursday
Email: rstoneman@sjsd.org

Online order at this Website: media.sjsd.org

Click here for New Fall 2014  Catalog

We accept purchase orders, credit cards, and checks.
We bill only for items shipped and actual cost of shipping.
Personal orders ship after payment is received.
Please estimate 10% of purchase total for shipping cost.

Navajo Language Lesson 2 Hogan Part 1

I will speak about the hogan.

Hooghan baah hashne’ doolee.

Lesson by Clayton Long

Hogan Slide Presentation in Navajo and English

Navajo Language Lesson links

Clayton Long – Instructor

Clayton Long YouTube Channel

Mana Academy

Navajo Language Lessons Page

Navajo Language Lessons YouTube Channel

Navajo People Language Page

Heritage Language Resource Center

Harold Carey Jr – Computer Teacher