Navajo Hero Twins Story Part 1

Hero Twins Video Part 1

Navajo Language Lesson by Clayton Long

Ashiikè Naakií baa hashne’ dooleel.

Navajo Hero Twins Presentation Part 1

From the book:  The Legend of the Navajo Hero Twins

by Don Mose, Jr.
Illustrated by Charles Yanito

Navajo Language Lesson links

Clayton Long – Instructor

Clayton Long YouTube Channel

Mana Academy

Navajo Language Lessons Page

Navajo Language Lessons YouTube Channel

Navajo People Language Page

Heritage Language Resource Center

Harold Carey Jr – Computer Teacher

The Legend of the Navajo Hero Twins

Book Review of 

The Legend of the Navajo Hero Twins

by Don Mose, Jr.
Illustrated by Charles Yanito

 

gend of the Navajo Hero Twins cover

Naayéé’neizghání (Slayer of Monsters) and Tóbájíshchíní (Born for Water) are the Navajo Hero Twins.

Lavishly illustrated with the world-class artwork of Charles Yanito. (37  illustrations)

Experience the Journey!

Read about the epic journey of the Navajo Hero Twins, the traditional narrative that parallels the journey of life and defines the foundation of Navajo culture.The book covers:

  • Raising the Twins
  • Spider Woman Prepares the Twins
  • Journey to the Father on the Holy Trail
  • Sun Bearer Challenges the Twins
  • The Sweat Lodge
  • The Weapons
  • The Sacred Mountains
  • Holy Beings Teach the Twins
  • The Twins Kill the Monsters
  • A Home in the West
  • The Story of the Hero Twins Lives on Today

… and many other topics.

 

Don Mose Jr
Don Mose, Jr., traditional storyteller

Don Mose, Jr. is a member of the Diné Nation, originally from the small reservation community of pinon, Arizona. Storylling has always been an important part of Don,s life. As a boy, Don listened to his Grandfather and his Aunt as they related the timeless history and narratives of the Diné. Don has commjtted his life’s work to sharing these traditional stories with the younger generations. ln his quest to keep the flames of Diné culture alive, Don has been inspired by the traditional people of the far north, the Athabascan relatives he met on his journeys to Siberia and the Yukon. lt is Don’s desire that these stories be used to help students.

Charles Yanito artist and illustrator
Charles Yanito artist and illustrator

Charles Yanito was born in Bluff, Utah to the Tl’ash chii and the Toh dich’iinih clans. He attended the lnstitute of American lndian Arts and holds degrees from the College of Eastern Utah and Utah State University. He has exhibited his works in numerous galleries and regional art festivals. His illushations can be seen in many San Juan Schools Heritage Language Resource Centor publlcaflons, Currenfly, Charles resides in Bear, Delaware with his famlly.

 

 

Navajo Old Age Illustration by Charles Yanit

The twins were on their way, together again. As they reached the foot of the mountain, they saw
an old woman. She walked slowly towards them, leaning on her cane. Everything her was old, her wrinkled face, her thin arms, her bent back. She looked so tired, and she even spoke slowly, with a quaver in her voice. “So, you are the warrior boys. Whst brings you to Dibe Nitsaa?”

Navajo Old Age Illustration by Charles Yanit 


Book measures 8.5 “ x 11”

Spiral Bound for easy reading 

Initial introductory printing — soft cover — $35.00 

To Purchase:
Heritage Language Resource Center
Navajo and Ute Language Resources
28 West 20 North
Blanding, Utah 8451
435 -678 -1230
Website: media.sjsd.org

Posters from the book

The posters are Available in 2 sizes:
17” x 22” – $7.00 each or $25.00 for the 4 poster set
11” x 14” – $3.00 each or $10.00 for the 4 poster set

The Holy Beings Teach the Navajo Twins Poster

The Holy Beings Teach the Navajo Twins Poster

The Navajo Hero Twins Receive Their Weapons

Navajo Winter Storytelling Poster
Recounting the Journeys of the Navajo Hero Twins

 


Navajo People Website Links:
Navajo Culture – Navajo History – Navajo Art – Navajo Clothing Navajo Pictures – Navajo Rugs – Navajo Language– Navajo Jewelry – Navajo Code Talker – Navajo Pottery – Navajo Legends – Hogan’s – Sand Painting – Navajo Food – Navajo News – Navajo Nation

Canyon de Chelly – Chinle, AZ

Canyon de Chelly (pronounced “dee shay”) was authorized in 1931 by President Herbert Hoover as a National Monument in large measure to preserve the important archeological resources that span more than 4,000 years of human occupation.

Canyon de Chelly Spider Rock, home of Spider Woman - Photo by Harold Carey Jr.
Canyon de Chelly Spider Rock, home of Spider Woman – Photo by Harold Carey Jr.

The agreement left most of the landscape as the property of the Navajo Nation. About 40-50 Navajo families that own land on the canyon floor, continue to farm that land, raise livestock there in summer, and guide tours. They now grow Corn, squash, tomatoes, cherries, pears and apricots in the Valley. Cattle and horses roam some of the fields.

For nearly 5,000 years the main and side canyons of Canyon de Chelly have been occupied, the longest continuous stretch of habitation on the Colorado Plateau, according to the Park Service.

Canyon de Chelly White House Ruins - Photo by Harold Carey Jr.
Canyon de Chelly White House Ruins – Photo by Harold Carey Jr.

No Entrance Fee
There is no fee for park entrance; however, the park does appreciate donations. Donations can be dropped in the donation box inside the visitor center.

The Visitor Center is open daily all year from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., except for Christmas Day.

Suggestions If You Just Have:
2 Hours – Visit all 7 overlooks on South Rim Drive OR visit all 3 overlooks on North Rim Drive.

1/2 Day – Visit all 10 overlooks on South and North Rim Drive OR Visit the South Rim Drive and hike the White House Trail OR join a half day guided tour.

1 Day – Visit all 10 overlooks on South and North Rim Drives plus hike the White House Trail OR visit all 10 overlooks plus join a half day guided tour OR join an all-day guided tour.

2 Days – Visit all 10 overlooks on the South and North Rim Drives, hike the White House Trail AND join an all-day guided tour.

Canyon de Chelly - Photo by Harold Carey Jr.
Canyon de Chelly – Photo by Harold Carey Jr.

 

Canyon de Chelly - Photo by Harold Carey Jr.
Canyon de Chelly – Photo by Harold Carey Jr.