Parts of the Body in Navajo Language

Hats’íís – Parts of the Body

New Poster

Parts of the Body in Navajo Language

This Poster illustrates the appropriate references for body parts.

All terms in Navajo Language

Available in two sizes:
17” x 22” – $6.00
11” x 17” – $2.00

Ordering Information

San Juan School District
Heritage Language Resource Center
28 West 200 North
Phone: 435-678-1230
FAX: 435-678-1283
Store Hours: 9:00 – 4:30
Monday through Thursday
Email: rstoneman@sjsd.org

Online order at this Website: media.sjsd.org

Click here for New Fall 2013  Catalog

We accept purchase orders, credit cards, and checks.
We bill only for items shipped and actual cost of shipping.
Personal orders ship after payment is received.
Please estimate 10% of purchase total for shipping cost.

Navajo Nation Atlas – Kèèdahwiit’íídi

This  Atlas is all in the Navajo Language

Navajo Nation Atlas - Kèèdahwiit'íídi

Created, Illustrated, & Designed by Sebastian Wittig

62 color pages

Explore Dineh Bikeyah through the pages of the Atlas

Learn Place Names in Navajo

English index

Price $25.00

Ordering Information

San Juan School District
Heritage Language Resource Center
28 West 200 North
Phone: 435-678-1230
FAX: 435-678-1283
Store Hours: 9:00 – 4:30
Monday through Thursday
Email: rstoneman@sjsd.org

Online order at this Website: media.sjsd.org

Click here for New Fall 2013  Catalog

We accept purchase orders, credit cards, and checks.
We bill only for items shipped and actual cost of shipping.
Personal orders ship after payment is received.
Please estimate 10% of purchase total for shipping cost.

Navajo Language Children’s Songbook

New children’s songbook, 30 pages with a CD.

Navajo Language Children’s Songbook

Sung by Cecelia Leeboy, former language teacher from San Juan Schools.

The front cover has the coyote with the little bird.

It is called, “Shil Hotaal,” which means, “ Sing with Us.”

Songs include children’s nursery rhymes, such as baa baa black sheep, Farmer in the Dell, etc. all in Navajo language.

Price $15.00 – book is 32 pages with both lyrics and music plus CD

To Purchase:
Heritage Language Resource Center
Navajo and Ute Language Resources
28 West 20 North
Blanding, Utah 8451
435 -678 -1230
Website: media.sjsd.org

Little Lambs – Navajo Language Lesson

Little Lambs - Navajo Language Lesson

 

LITTLE LAMBS
The little lambs are born.
Near the waterhole my mother makes shelters of green boughs for the mother sheep.
There in the shelters the l ittle lambs are born.

The green boughs stand close together, they do not let the snow nor the wind nor the sand come in to hurt the lambs.
Soon the lambs will be big enough to play with me.

 Source : “Little Herder in the Spring” by Ann Clark 1940

Illustrated by:
Hoke Denetsosie
Linguistics by:
John P. Harrington
Robert W. Young

More Navajo Language Lessons

Field – Navajo Language Lesson

Field - Navajo Language Lesson

THE FIELD
In a little delta of seepage water near the waterhole is a small place that my father has fenced to make a home for the corn, for the squash and the melons.

It is too cold now, but soon, when the snow melts and hides away in the warm sand father will go to his field. There he will make the soil ready for planting.

He will break through the hard crust of winter and turn up toward the sun little lumps of fresh earth.


 Source : “Little Herder in the Spring” by Ann Clark 1940

Illustrated by:
Hoke Denetsosie
Linguistics by:
John P. Harrington
Robert W. Young

More Navajo Language Lessons

The Waterhole – Navajo Language Lesson

The Waterhole - Navajo Language Lesson

 

 

THE WATERHOLE
The waterhole hides away behind the red rocks, but my sheep know where to find it.
Their little feet have made a deep trail from the corral to the waterhole.

 
 

How to Start Conversations in the Navajo Language

Video and Text by daybreakwarrior

 

When people want to learn conversational Navajo, they always want to learn how to say, “How are you doing?” There are ways to say this, namely:

Hait’áo naniná?
Haa lá ánít’é?

You can ask these but they’re not usually conversation starters. These are used if you know the person is not emotionally doing well or physically sick or something.

A better way to begin a conversation is to use the starter, “Áá'” This phrase literally means “open up,” but can also mean like, “tell me about it.” It can be used alone in the right scenario or used in combination with starter questions:

Áá’ ha’íí baa naniná?
What are you doing?

Áá’ ha’íí baa nídinídzá?
What will you be doing?

Áá’ ha’íí baa nisíníyá?
What were you doing?

Áá’ háágóó díníya?
Where are you going?

Áá’ háágóó nisíníyá?
Where did you go?

Áá’ háádé?é?’?
Where are you from?

Áá’ háádé?é?’ísh yínáál?
Where you coming from?

Áá’ ha’íí baa dahane’?
What’s the news?

Áá’ ha’íí daha’ní?
What’s the gossip?

Áá’ ha’íí hodoo’niid?
What was said?

Áá’ ha’íí?
What’s up?

Video and Text by daybreakwarrior

Conversational Navajo Lesson Video by DaybreakWarrior

Conversational Navajo Lesson: Emotion Vocabulary

 


This video is essentially a continuation of the previous video called, “How to Start Conversations in the Navajo Language.” Essentially, I introduced the phrase, “Haa ánít’é?” which means, “How are you doing?”

Of course it isn’t quite useful if you don’t know how to respond to this question. So in this video, I provided the different ways in which you can respond to this question along with providing some vocabulary words for various emotions in Navajo.

In addition to this, I’ve also included the basic ways you can respond to, “Haa lá ánít’é?” by responding with:

Bil nisin (sleepy)
Dichin nisin (hungry)
Dibáá’ nisin (thirsty)

Though, I’m grateful that someone took the time to translate the emotions on that “How Are You Doing Today?” chart in Navajo, it is more useful to have it in 1st person as opposed to 3rd person so you can learn the emotions. I hope you like this video… enjoy!

Click Here to Subscribe to daybreakwarrior

The Puppy – Navajo Language Lesson

 

The Puppy - Navajo Language Lesson

THE PUPPY

Far from the hogan in a dry sand wash I found the gray dog
and a new baby puppy gray with black spots.

Poor little puppy, it crawled to me crying.  

Thin little baby, its pink cold nose found my hand.

You gray pup with black spots.
I will teach you to watch the sheep so that always there will be a place for you in our hogan.

 


 Source : “Little Herder in the Spring” by Ann Clark 1940

Illustrated by:
Hoke Denetsosie
Linguistics by:
John P. Harrington
Robert W. Young

More Navajo Language Lessons

Sheep Corral – Navajo Language Lesson

Sheep Corral - Navajo Language Lesson

 

SHEEP CORRAL
Near my mother’s hogan is the sheep corral, a hard packed place fenced with poles.
There is a tree for shade.
There is a shelter for lambs in the sheep corral.

 Source : “Little Herder in the Spring” by Ann Clark 1940

Illustrated by:
Hoke Denetsosie
Linguistics by:
John P. Harrington
Robert W. Young

More Navajo Language Lessons