Gobernador Knob – Navajo Sacred Mountain

Gobernador Knob (Ch’óol’í’í – Fir Mountain)

 

Gobernador Knob the site where the Navajo’s Divine Goddess, Changing Woman (‘Asdzáá Nadleehe), was found by Talking God (Haashch’eelti’i) .

The Navajo have many traditions relating to Gobernador Knob. Navajo beliefs say that it represents the “Heart” of Navajo Country

Gobernador Knob also represents the outward look of the Male Hogan.

The traditional Navajo ancestral home is the area encompassed by the four sacred mountains but it’s “heart” is at Gobernador Knob, located near the north-east corner of the enlarged area of the map, where
Gobernador Knob - Navajo Sacred Mountain

Gobernador Knob is a small hump on Spruce Mountain (or Fir Mountain), that rises about 90 to 100 feet from Spruce Hill, having an overall elevation of 8,000 feet. Gobernardor Knob rises above the high broken mesa countryside sloping west from the Continental Divide to the Largo Canyon,

There are a number of identified Navajo remains in the vicinity of the Knob itself and the region is a part of the Dinétah (The original or old Navajo Country). At about 1921, Dr. Alfred V. Kidder of the Phillips-Andover Academy investigated what he believed to have been refugee sites of Puebloans fleeing Spanish vengeance during the troubled years during and following the Pueblo Rebellion of 1680.

 

The Four Navajo Sacred Mountains

Mount Blanca (Tsisnaasjini’ – Dawn or White Shell Mountain – East
Mount Taylor (Tsoodzil – Blue Bead or Turquoise Mountain) – South
San Francisco Peaks (Doko’oosliid – Abalone Shell Mountain) – West
Mount Hesperus Dibé Nitsaa (Big Mountain Sheep) – Obsidian Mountain – North

Navajo People Website Links:

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Comments

  1. Alex Mitchell says:

    Harold,
    would you please take the artwork, stories and my late father’s name Mike Mitchell off the website you’ve created. I’m the one that painted the artwork at Rough Rock Navajo Studies back in ’98. I would really appreciated if you could do that..asap!
    Axe’hee, Thank you,

  2. Harold Carey Jr says:

    I removed the artwork.
    http://navajopeople.org/blog/gobernador-knob-navajo-sacred-mountain/

    Thank you for the comment.
    I bought the book and like it very much.
    I could write a review of it and help you sell it if you like.
    -Harold

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