The Legend of the Horse – Book

Book Review of  “The Legend of the Horse”

A Traditional Story in Both Navajo and English

The Legend of the Horse Cover

Sun bearer created the horse with elements from fathers God in mother Earth. He made the horses years of sprouting plants, white corn. This made the horse keno hearing and alert to noises from far-off. He placed the stars and the dark universe in the horses eyes, so he could see the dark. Eagle water of every kind in the horses face, which gives him his shiny appearance in good health. Sun bearer used shells for the horses lips and teeth.

The Legend of the Horse-2

He created the horse so that when he gallops, he sounds like thunder, and his main and tall swirl like clouds or hang down like falling rain. His legs flesh out like lightning when he races. Sun bearer made his whose from precious stones, and his final creation, under each of the four groups, Sun bear place the special image of an arrowhead as a symbol of protection.

The Legend of the Horse

by Don Mose, Jr.
Illustrated by Charles Yanito

This beautiful book recounts the story of the great
gift of the Holy People to the Diné. 26 pages.

This is a bilingual book; read the Navajo text, then flip the book for the English
translation.

Paperback & Perfect-Bound
$10.00

Be sure to check out the companion poster,
available in three sizes.

Don Mose Jr
Don Mose, Jr., traditional storytellerDon Mose, Jr. is a member of the Diné Nation, originally from the small reservation community of pinon, Arizona. Storylling has always been an important part of Don,s life. As a boy, Don listened to his Grandfather and his Aunt as they related the timeless history and narratives of the Diné. Don has commjtted his life’s work to sharing these traditional stories with the younger generations. ln his quest to keep the flames of Diné culture alive, Don has been inspired by the traditional people of the far north, the Athabascan relatives he met on his journeys to Siberia and the Yukon. lt is Don’s desire that these stories be used to help students.
Charles Yanito artist and illustrator
Charles Yanito artist and illustratorCharles Yanito was born in Bluff, Utah to the Tl’ash chii and the Toh dich’iinih clans. He attended the lnstitute of American lndian Arts and holds degrees from the College of Eastern Utah and Utah State University. He has exhibited his works in numerous galleries and regional art festivals. His illushations can be seen in many San Juan Schools Heritage Language Resource Centor publlcaflons, Currenfly, Charles resides in Bear, Delaware with his famlly.

 

Ordering Information

San Juan School District
Heritage Language Resource Center
28 West 200 North
Phone: 435-678-1230
FAX: 435-678-1283
Store Hours: 9:00 – 4:30
Monday through Thursday
Email: rstoneman@sjsd.org

Online order at this Website: media.sjsd.org

Click here for New Fall 2013  Catalog

We accept purchase orders, credit cards, and checks.
We bill only for items shipped and actual cost of shipping.
Personal orders ship after payment is received.
Please estimate 10% of purchase total for shipping cost.

Other Books and Posters

The Legend of the Navajo Hero Twins Book Review

Changing Woman Protects Her Sons

The Holy Beings Teach the Navajo Twins Poster

Navajo Winter Storytelling Poster

The Navajo Hero Twins Receive Their Weapons – Poster

Tsidil – Navajo Stick Game

Book Review of  ”The Legend of the Horse”

Legend of the Horse Poster

K’é – Diné (Navajo) Kinship System

 

 


Navajo People Website Links:
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Navajo Hero Twins Poster

Naayéé’neizghání (Slayer of Monsters) and

Tóbájíshchíní (Born for Water) are the Navajo Hero Twins.

Navajo Hero Twins Poster

Navajo Hero Twins Poster © 2013 Heritage Language Resource Center. All rights reserved

They stand tall, ready to defend their People, the Diné, from all enemies.

Given the gift of the Eagle Feather to surmount their challenges and weapons of the Sun Bearer, these young boys became strong defenders and leaders of their People.

 

Charles Yanito artist and illustrator

 Illustrated  artwork by Charles Yanito.

From the book:  The Legend of the Navajo Hero Twins

The posters are Available in 2 sizes:
17” x 22” – $7.00 each or $25.00 for the 4 poster set
11” x 14” – $3.00 each or $10.00 for the 4 poster set

To Purchase:
Heritage Language Resource Center
Navajo and Ute Language Resources
28 West 20 North
Blanding, Utah 8451
435 -678 -1230
Website: media.sjsd.org

The Legend of the Navajo Hero Twins

Book Review of 

The Legend of the Navajo Hero Twins

by Don Mose, Jr.
Illustrated by Charles Yanito

 

gend of the Navajo Hero Twins cover

Naayéé’neizghání (Slayer of Monsters) and Tóbájíshchíní (Born for Water) are the Navajo Hero Twins.

Lavishly illustrated with the world-class artwork of Charles Yanito. (37  illustrations)

Experience the Journey!

Read about the epic journey of the Navajo Hero Twins, the traditional narrative that parallels the journey of life and defines the foundation of Navajo culture.The book covers:

  • Raising the Twins
  • Spider Woman Prepares the Twins
  • Journey to the Father on the Holy Trail
  • Sun Bearer Challenges the Twins
  • The Sweat Lodge
  • The Weapons
  • The Sacred Mountains
  • Holy Beings Teach the Twins
  • The Twins Kill the Monsters
  • A Home in the West
  • The Story of the Hero Twins Lives on Today

… and many other topics.

 

Don Mose Jr
Don Mose, Jr., traditional storyteller

Don Mose, Jr. is a member of the Diné Nation, originally from the small reservation community of pinon, Arizona. Storylling has always been an important part of Don,s life. As a boy, Don listened to his Grandfather and his Aunt as they related the timeless history and narratives of the Diné. Don has commjtted his life’s work to sharing these traditional stories with the younger generations. ln his quest to keep the flames of Diné culture alive, Don has been inspired by the traditional people of the far north, the Athabascan relatives he met on his journeys to Siberia and the Yukon. lt is Don’s desire that these stories be used to help students.

Charles Yanito artist and illustrator
Charles Yanito artist and illustrator

Charles Yanito was born in Bluff, Utah to the Tl’ash chii and the Toh dich’iinih clans. He attended the lnstitute of American lndian Arts and holds degrees from the College of Eastern Utah and Utah State University. He has exhibited his works in numerous galleries and regional art festivals. His illushations can be seen in many San Juan Schools Heritage Language Resource Centor publlcaflons, Currenfly, Charles resides in Bear, Delaware with his famlly.

 

 

Navajo Old Age Illustration by Charles Yanit

The twins were on their way, together again. As they reached the foot of the mountain, they saw
an old woman. She walked slowly towards them, leaning on her cane. Everything her was old, her wrinkled face, her thin arms, her bent back. She looked so tired, and she even spoke slowly, with a quaver in her voice. “So, you are the warrior boys. Whst brings you to Dibe Nitsaa?”

Navajo Old Age Illustration by Charles Yanit 


Book measures 8.5 “ x 11”

Spiral Bound for easy reading 

Initial introductory printing — soft cover — $35.00 

To Purchase:
Heritage Language Resource Center
Navajo and Ute Language Resources
28 West 20 North
Blanding, Utah 8451
435 -678 -1230
Website: media.sjsd.org

Posters from the book

The posters are Available in 2 sizes:
17” x 22” – $7.00 each or $25.00 for the 4 poster set
11” x 14” – $3.00 each or $10.00 for the 4 poster set

The Holy Beings Teach the Navajo Twins Poster

The Holy Beings Teach the Navajo Twins Poster

The Navajo Hero Twins Receive Their Weapons

Navajo Winter Storytelling Poster
Recounting the Journeys of the Navajo Hero Twins

 


Navajo People Website Links:
Navajo Culture – Navajo History – Navajo Art – Navajo Clothing Navajo Pictures – Navajo Rugs – Navajo Language– Navajo Jewelry – Navajo Code Talker – Navajo Pottery – Navajo Legends – Hogan’s – Sand Painting – Navajo Food – Navajo News – Navajo Nation

Navajo Shoe Game Featured at Balloon Event

Navajo Shoe Game Featured at the  Third Annual Monument Valley Hot Air Balloon Event

Monument Valley Hot Air Balloon Event Navajo Shoe Game

Winter on the Navajo Nation is a time when healing through laughter begins.
In fact, it is also a time to listen and learn about the emergence of the Navajo people. Winter is when many traditional oral Navajo stories are told that embody the spirit and wisdom of various animals and birds. According to traditional Navajo elders, animals and birds played a very significant role in early Navajo history and still do today.
It is said that animals such as the coyote, bear and owl were put upon Mother Earth to educate, heal and provide guidance for the Navajo people. Navajo legend says that in early Navajo history, animals and birds communicated with each other.

And virtually every animal and bird has a purpose and role in traditional Navajo culture.
Traditional Navajo elders note that similar to human beings, the animals and birds in early Navajo history began to disagree with each other. One point of discussion was whether or not it should always be day or night. Hence, the animals and birds decided to play a game to determine which it would be. It is said that neither the day or night creatures won; therefore, we now have day and night.
Today, that game is still played during the winter season and is it called a traditional Navajo shoe game, which continues to have lot of spiritual significance. In fact, many of the Navajo shoe game songs that are sung today are the same songs that specific animals and birds sung during the original shoe game that was first held in the beginning of time.
Depending on what part of the reservation it is held, each Navajo shoe game may differ. However, laughter is a central part of all Navajo shoe games. Moreover, there are various traditional Navajo stories that talk about humor and how it helps to heal the sick.
The Navajo shoe game was initially called a moccasin game and held in conjunction with a specific ceremony such as a five-day Evil Way Ceremony. Over time, it has slowly changed through the years. Case in point, most people today use cowboy boots or shoes in place of moccasins. What continues is the use of a yucca ball and 102 yucca stems.
Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation Department Director Martin L. Begaye said, “We’re very excited that a traditional Navajo shoe game will be added to the Third Annual Monument Valley Balloon Event. This is a traditional Navajo social game that is very popular among the Navajo people especially our Navajo elders. It is very important that the Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation Department work closely with the Navajo people and receive their support and participation on such activities as this great annual event.”
The Third Annual Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park Hot Air Balloon Event will be held on January 11-13, 2013 at Monument Valley.
Begay added, “This is the only hot air balloon event in the world that will include a traditional Navajo shoe game. The event will have a little bit of everything for people of all ages.”
Other events that are being held in conjunction with the annual hot air balloon event is an art and writing contest for the youth and an array of prizes that will be awarded. The deadline for the writing and art contest is December 14, 2013. The annual event will also feature 20 hot air balloon pilots from throughout the country and a hot air balloon night glow.
You can obtain additional information at www.navajonationparks.org

Media Contact: Roberta John
Senior Economic Development Specialist
Navajo Nation Parks & Recreation Department
(928) 871-6647
Email: bobbie@navajonationparks.org
Navajo People Website Links:
Navajo CultureNavajo HistoryNavajo ArtNavajo Clothing Navajo PicturesNavajo RugsNavajo LanguageNavajo JewelryNavajo Code TalkerNavajo PotteryNavajo LegendsHogan’sSand PaintingNavajo Food Navajo NewsNavajo Nation